Computing » Filesystem interoperability

Note: this list does not mentio

Also, this is by no means an exhaustive list, so please do contact me if you have any update suggestions.

Sources:

ADFS / Advanced Disc Filing System

Acorn’s successor to DFS. Also known as Filecore.

AdvFS / Advanced File System

Highly reliable filesystem originally for Digital/Tru64 UNIX.

Can likely be accessed via emulators and common-denominator filesystems; needs research/testing.

APFS / Apple File System

Apple’s proprietary “next-generation” filesystem to superseed HFS+.

Easily accessible on Windows/Linux/*BSD/etc. by common means of file transfer, e.g. a FAT32 flash drive or e-Mail.

Apple DOS 3.𝑥 filesystem

Floppy disk format for DOS on the Apple II.

AFS / AtheOS File System

Journalling filesystem for the obscure AtheOS, Syllable and Wave OS.

Can likely be accessed via emulators and common-denominator filesystems; needs research/testing.

BFS / Boot File System

Simple filesystem that contained files necessary for booting some old UNIX OSes.

BFS/BeFS / Be File System

BeOS and Haiku’s native filesystem.

BFS / Byte File System

IBM’s filesystem for Unix applications on z/VM.

Can likely be accessed via emulators and common-denominator filesystems; needs research.

Btrfs / B-tree file system

Increasingly popular scalable filesystem.

CBMFS

Commodore floppy disk drive OS’ native filesystem.

CDFS / Compact Disc File System

Predecessor to ISO 9660, developed by Simson Garfinkel and J. Spencer Love.

Only known by name; needs research.

CP/M filesystem

Disk format for the original CP/M.

DFS (Acorn) / Disc Filing System

A somewhat simple filesystem notorious for its differing implementations. Superseded by ADFS.

DFS (IBM)

Only known by name; needs research.

EROFS / Enhanced Read-only File System

Lightweight read-only filesystem.

EFS / Extent File System

Pioneering extent-based filesystem, superseded by XFS.

exFAT / Extensible File Allocation Table

Microsoft’s flash-friendly replacement for FAT32.

ext / Extended file system

Original filesystem for Linux, replacing the MINIX filesystem. Quickly superseded by ext2, though often used on Linux floppies.

ext2 / Second extended file system

Successor to ext. Still somewhat in use for removable media, though eventually superseded by ext3.

ext3 / Third extended file system

Successor to ext2, adding journalling. Somewhat quickly superseded by ext4.

ext3cow / Third extended file system with copy-on-write

Copy-on-write-enabled version of ext3.

ext4 / Fourth extended file system

Successor to ext3, improving performance and limitations. Can be journalled or journalless.

FAT / File Allocation Table

Original 8-bit structure for Microsoft’s various BASIC disks.

Might be accessible by later versions of FAT; needs research/testing.

FAT12 / 12-bit File Allocation Table

Essentially a noncompatible rewrite of 8-bit FAT, designed to be more compatible with CP/M’s standards. Common on most all floppy disks, though otherwise superseded by the backwards-compatible FAT16B for most purposes.

Possibly accessible by later versions of FAT on Linux/BSD/etc.; needs research/testing.

FAT16 / 16-bit File Allocation Table

Backwards-compatible successor to 12-bit FAT. Note that when most people mention FAT16, they’re likely talking about its quick successor, FAT16B.

FAT16B / 16-bit File Allocation Table, version B

An expansion to the original FAT16 with 32-bit sector counts, allowing usage of larger disks. When most people mention FAT16, they actually mean FAT16B. Superseded by the backwards-compatible FAT32 for most purposes.

Possibly accessible by later versions of FAT on Linux/BSD/etc.; needs research/testing.

FAT32 / 32-bit File Allocation Table

Backwards-compatible successor to FAT16B with support for much larger disks. Still commonly used on removable media and as a common-denominator filesystem.

FFS/AFFS / Amiga Fast File System

Amiga’s HDD-friendly replacement for OFS.

Files-11

OpenVMS filesystem. Also known as ODS, for whatever reason.

HAMMER

High-availability filesystem originally for DragonFly BSD. Superseded by the backwards-compatible HAMMER2.

HAMMER2

Successor to HAMMER with enhanced clustering.

HFS / Hierarchal File System (IBM)

Not to be confused with Apple’s HFS.

HFS / Hierarchal File System (Apple)

Successor to MFS to support hard disks.

HFS+ / Hierarchal File System Plus

Successor to HFS, with better support for larger files. Superseded by APFS.

HPFS / High Performance File System

OS/2’s much-improved replacement of the FAT filesystem.

High Throughput File System

Journalling filesystem of SCO OpenServer.

ISO 9660

The ubiquitous CD-ROM filesystem.

This filesystem is so universally understood that I can’t (currently) be bothered to list off every compatible OS. in-progress

JFFS / Journalling Flash File System

A popular flash-friendly filesystem.

JFS / Journaling File System

IBM’s journalling filesystem, first used for AIX.

LFS / Log-structured File System

Proof-of-concept added to 4.4BSD.

LTFS / Linear Tape File System

Filesystem designed to make tape access behave more like a disk.

MFS / Macintosh File System

Original filesystem for the Macintosh for a short period before HFS.

MINIX file system

Originally a simplified, educational variant of UFS.

NILFS / New Implementation of a Log-structured File System

Another sort of proof-of-concept logging filesystem.

NOVA / Non-volatile Memory Accelerated

Log-structured filesystem for persistent memory.

NTFS / New Technology File System

Microsoft’s most successful take on a journalling filesystem.

NVFS / Non-volatile File System

Flash memory filesystem made by Palm.

Unsure how to access it outside of PalmPilot devices.

NWFS / NetWare File System

A heavily modified version of FAT by Novell. Superseded by NSS.

NSS / Novell Storage Services

Novell’s successor to NWFS.

OFS / Amiga Old File System

Amiga’s predecessor to AFFS. Somewhat useless on anything but floppies.

OS-9 file system

Forested filesystem.

PFS / Professional File System

ProDOS file system

Filesystem native to the ProDOS on the Apple II.

QNX4FS / QNX version 4 file system

ReFS / Resilient File System

Microsoft’s enterprise-grade successor to NTFS. Can’t boot off it, though.

ReiserFS

Yet another general-purpose filesystem for Linux.

Reliance

An embedded filesystem.

Reliance Nitro

A higher-performance rendition of Reliance.

SFS / Amiga Smart File System

Amiga’s better-performing alternative to AFFS.

SkyFS / SkyOS File System

A fork of BFS for SkyOS.

Soup

Shallow database of sorts for the Newton platform.

Tux3

Experimental fork of ext3 with versioning.

TRSDOS filesystem

Used on the Tandy TRS-80 family.

Only known by name; needs research.

UBIFS / Unsorted Block Image File System

Nokia’s NAND-friendly alternative to JFFS2.

UDF / Universal Disk Format

A write-once media format that supplanted ISO 9660.

This filesystem is so universally understood that I can’t (currently) be bothered to list off every compatible OS. in-progress

UFS / Unix File System

Disregarding mutually compatible vendor-specific additions, practically the original Version 7 Unix filesystem. Also known as FFS / Fast File System in some systems.

UFS2 / Unix File System, version 2

VxFS / Veritas File System

Extent-based filesystem developed for AT&T USL. Also known as JFS.

WOFS / Write-once File System

A predecessor to ISO 9660 based on CDFS and sold by N/Hance.

Only known by name; needs research.

XFS

SGI said it wasn’t an acronym, but I’m pretty sure “FS” at least stands for “filesystem”.

Xiafs

A replacement for the MINIX filesystem for Linux, competing with ext for a short time.

YAFFS / Yet Another Flash File System

A log-structured filesystem widely used in embedded and portable systems.

zFS / z/OS File System

IBM’s crack at a high-performance mainframe filesystem. Not to be confused with ZFS.

ZFS / Zettabyte File System

A sort-of filesystem-LVM hybrid by Sun.